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Developing a strategy for assessing the extent of selective reporting in primary studies when including non-randomised studies (NRS) in a systematic review

Topic category Investigating bias
Date and Location
Fecha: 
Jueves 20 Octubre 2011 - 14:00 - 15:30
Location: 
Methods Group
Methods Group: 
Non-Randomised Studies Methods Group
Contact person
Contact person: 
Barnaby Reeves (Contact this person)
Facilitators
NombreApellidoAffiliation and Country
Nombre: 
Barnaby
Apellido: 
Reeves
Affiliation and Country: 
Non-Randomized Studies Methods Group
Other contributors
NombreApellidoAffiliation and Country
Nombre: 
Susan
Apellido: 
Norris
Affiliation and Country: 
Oregon Health & Science University
Nombre: 
Bev
Apellido: 
Shea
Affiliation and Country: 
University of Ottawa
Nombre: 
George
Apellido: 
Wells
Affiliation and Country: 
University of Ottawa
Target audience
Target audience: 
Coeds, methodologists and review authors
Is your workshop restricted to a specific audience or open to all Colloquium participants?: 
Open
Level of knowledge required: 
Advanced
Type of workshop
Type of workshop: 
Discussion
Abstract text
Abstract: 
Objectives:
The workshop aims to discuss with methodologists and reviewers how best to assess selective reporting in primary non-randomised studies (NRS). Most of the workshop will be taken up by participants discussing a limited number of key issues identified by the facilitator.
Description:
This workshop is aimed at methodologists and reviewers considering whether or not to include non-randomised studies (NRS) in Cochrane systematic reviews.
Identifying the risk of selective reporting and associated risk of bias is, increasingly, a challenge in reviews including randomised controlled trials (RCTs). These risks are believed to greater for NRS, extending beyond selective outcome reporting to selective analysis reporting. Participants will discuss:
(a) The potential opportunity for bias relative to selective reporting in RCTs;
(b) Whether the risk of selective reporting and associated biases is likely to vary for benefits and harms;
(c) The importance of pre-specifying in the protocol methods to identify selective reporting in primary studies and possible tools for review authors to use;
(d) Initiatives that could be implemented to reduce the risk of selective reporting and associated biases in NRS.
The discussion will inform guidance being developed by the Non-Randomised Studies Methods Group for inclusion in a revision of its Handbook chapter.