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An introduction to systematic reviews of prognosis and prognostic factors

Topic category Other methods for preparing systematic reviews
Date and Location
Date: 
Thursday 20 October 2011 - 14:00 - 15:30
Location: 
Methods Group
Methods Group: 
Prognosis Methods Group
Contact person
Contact person: 
Jill Hayden (Contact this person)
Facilitators
First nameLast nameAffiliation and Country
First name: 
Jill
Last name: 
Hayden
Affiliation and Country: 
Dalhousie University, Canada
First name: 
Karel
Last name: 
Moons
Affiliation and Country: 
UMC Utrecht, the Netherlands
First name: 
Katrina
Last name: 
Williams
Affiliation and Country: 
The Royal Children's Hospital, Australia
Other contributors
First nameLast nameAffiliation and Country
First name: 
Riekie
Last name: 
de Vet
Affiliation and Country: 
VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands
First name: 
Richard
Last name: 
Riley
Affiliation and Country: 
University of Birmingham, UK
First name: 
Douglas
Last name: 
Altman
Affiliation and Country: 
University of Oxford, UK
First name: 
Susan
Last name: 
Woolfenden
Affiliation and Country: 
Liverpool Health Service, Australia
Target audience
Target audience: 
Reviewers with an interest in learning about prognosis systematic reviews
Is your workshop restricted to a specific audience or open to all Colloquium participants?: 
Open
Level of knowledge required: 
Basic
Type of workshop
Type of workshop: 
Training
Abstract text
Abstract: 
Objectives:
This workshop will introduce participants to systematic reviews of prognosis. We will discuss challenges with this type of review and will help participants formulate a prognostic review question. Using published examples and exercises, we will introduce methods and resources for conducting a prognosis systematic review.

Description:
Prognosis is a description of the probable course or prediction of the outcome of a health condition over time. Important to prognosis is consideration of characteristics or factors that are associated with or determine the course of a health condition. Health-care professionals may use prognostic information to educate or inform the management of their patients. Like research on the effectiveness of interventions, prognostic evidence requires systematic and transparent synthesis. Although basic principles to reduce bias and random error are similar, there are several challenges unique to prognostic reviews.

In this workshop we will discuss three main types of related prognosis questions: ‘What is the most likely course of this health condition?’ (average/overall prognosis); ‘What factors are associated with, or determine outcome?’ (prognostic factors); and ‘Are there risk groups who are likely to have different outcomes?’ (risk prediction models). We will introduce methods and resources for planning a prognosis systematic review.